In the Whiteness

“in the whiteness” is a poetic exploration of identity through the eyes of a Harari-Ethiopian woman, displaced via war, now living in Canada. She uses poetry and movement as a meditative method of reconnecting with her roots and in doing so, establishes a magical bond with her ancestors.

Boys

“Boys” is a film is a hybrid, blurring the lines between documentary, fiction and imagination. It’s improvisation, play and time spent with true friends. “Boys” is the playfulness and pressure of being a boy, trying to be a man; the bright, bold colour of youth bursting through. Born out of the ideas behind The PappyShow theatre company’s award-winning stage show (The Barbican, Vaults Festival), “Boys” the film is devised by and stars a group of young men of colour.

The Noise My Leaves Make

The Noise my Leaves Make is a contemporary dance film that explores Black womanhood and the rural environment in England.

The film follows three dark-skinned Black women as they utilise their Africanist and Contemporary dance vocabulary to engage with the Leicestershire environment. As Black British women, this space has typically been denied to them as a place of belonging. Through their movement, these three women claim the countryside as their own finding sisterhood, connection, and joy.

Bezuna

Bezuna explores the complexities of fleeing a war-zone through the analysis of peripheral details. Through interweaving different narratives, the film presents the raw and broken feelings of a child and a cat whose lives will never be the same.

Black Barbie: A Documentary

Through intimate access to a charismatic Mattel insider, Beulah Mae Mitchell, Black Barbie delves into the cross section of merchandise and representation as Black women struggle to elevate their own voices and stories, refusing to be invisible. This film is a personal exploration that will tell a richly archival, thought-provoking story that gives voice to the insights and experiences of Beulah Mae Mitchell, the aunt of the Los Angeles-based filmmaker, who spent 45-years working at Mattel. Upon Mattel’s 1980 release of Black Barbie, the film turns to the intergenerational impact the doll had. Discussing how the absence of black images in the “social mirror” left Black girls with little other than White subjects for self-reflection and self-projection. Beulah Mae Mitchell and other Black women in the film talk about their own, complex, varied experience of not seeing themselves represented, and how Black Barbie’s transformative arrival affected them personally.

Shimoni (The Pit)

After 7 years in prison, 35 year old Geoffrey has to restart his life in Shimoni, where he renegotiates the confines of the physical world while forced to face his nightmare in the flesh.

It’s Nice in Here

A fragmented portrait of a boy nicknamed Crimson, seen through the eyes of the police officer that took his life and his best friend who witnessed it all.

One of Ours

Josiah Wilson was adopted as a baby in Haiti and raised in an Indigenous family in Calgary, Canada. Years later, when Josiah is racially profiled at an Indigenous basketball tournament and refused the right to play a sport he deeply loves, his experience makes the news. In the aftermath of this hurtful rejection, Josiah is left to examine his identity, his shaken sense of belonging and the complex relationships he has with this family and community. With the unwavering support of his loved ones, Josiah embarks on the difficult path of healing from his past and finding his footing in the world. With deep compassion for Josiah’s journey, this honest portrayal of complicated family dynamics boldly asks us to create space for non-linear paths to self-acceptance, while revealing the empowering experience of being accepted and loved by your community.

Benediksyon // Bendición (Benediction)

Two immigrant men of the Caribbean and Latin American diaspora reflect on their religious beliefs, past experiences and memories… from displacement, exile, and personal struggles within their own native countries to finding a sense of place and community in Homestead, Florida through the guidance of human perseverance and religion.

Dusty & Stones

“The most unlikely great documentary of the year is this one.” – Living Life Fearless

Dusty & Stones is a continent-crossing hero’s journey story told through country music. The documentary intimately chronicles the remarkable ride of cousins Gazi “Dusty” Simelane and Linda “Stones” Msibi, a determined duo of struggling country singers from the tiny African Kingdom of Eswatini (known as Swaziland at the time of filming) who long for their big break.

When they are unexpectedly invited to record their songs in Nashville and to compete in a Texas battle of the bands, Dusty and Stones embark on their long-awaited first pilgrimage to the ancestral heart of country music.

Over a momentous ten-day road trip through the American South, Dusty and Stones bring their music to life in a top Nashville recording studio, explore the storied locales of their favorite country songs, and excitedly engage with the culture they’ve long felt part of from afar.

But this sense of kinship is abruptly thrown into question when Dusty and Stones arrive in the small town of Jefferson, Texas to compete in the battle of the bands. There, the hostile leader of the local backing band threatens to derail the cousins’ debut American performance. As their family and friends back home wait for good news, a shell-shocked Dusty and Stones must take the stage and fight to bring home an award for Swaziland.

In the Whiteness

Boys

Bezuna

Black Barbie: A Documentary

Shimoni (The Pit)

It’s Nice in Here

One of Ours

Benediksyon // Bendición (Benediction)

Dusty & Stones

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Belmont, Port of Spain,
Trinidad and Tobago, WI

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